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The Internet is one of the most powerful communication tools available, making it possible to share information instantly, any time of the day or night, around the globe.
Criminals have capitalized on the broad power and wide availability of the Internet and electronic mail (e-mail) to defraud unsuspecting people. It is critical that each of us maintain constant vigilance over the way we use the Internet and all forms of electronic communication.
National Bank of Yemen maintains active oversight of all of our systems as part of our efforts to protect the security and privacy of client information.
If you have any concerns or questions, please contact your National Bank of Yemen representative or send a message.

Protect Yourself
To help protect yourself and your personal data, do not trust any e-mail communications that request your personal information.
Criminals can be convincing. They make their fraudulent e-mails look like they come from legitimate sources. They publish fake Web sites that use designs, information and programming stolen from their rightful owners. Don't fall for their ploys.

E-mail and Web Site Scams
E-mail is by far the most popular way for criminals to try to get your attention — and your personal information. An e-mail may direct you to a Web site designed and operated by criminals to trick you into revealing such information. Therefore, treat e-mail from someone you don't know the same way you would treat a telemarketing call from someone you don't know: don't necessarily believe what you're being told.
Fraudulent e-mails and Web sites are created every day to attempt to steal personal information. It's called "phishing" — a variation of the word "fishing." There are limitless variations of these online scams, so the best defense is education and a healthy dose of skepticism. A few misleading and deceptive techniques in use include the following:

  • The e-mail or Web site may appear to be genuine.
  • It may include a logo that appears legitimate.
  • It may ask you to click on a link to go to a Web site — the Web site address may, at first glance, appear legitimate and imply importance.
  • The e-mail or Web site may ask for you to supply account numbers, Social Security numbers, personal identification numbers (PINs), passwords or credit card numbers.
  • The e-mail or Web site may even already contain some of this information and is asking you to confirm the data.
  • You are right to be suspicious of any e-mail or Web site asking you to supply or confirm any personal information.

As technology and one's ability to detect these scams improves, so, unfortunately, do the criminals. The latest attacks do not even require you to do anything. Merely opening the e-mail can launch "hidden" software — a virus, "spyware" or other malicious code — that will download to and reside on your computer. Should they go undetected, any of these programs could compromise your computer in a variety of ways, including stealing private information, redirecting your Web surfing to unscrupulous sites and transmitting information that you type on your computer directly to the criminals. Therefore you should delete all unwanted and potentially fraudulent e-mails without opening them.
Some fraudulent e-mails, spear-phishing attempts for example, can be very well done and very convincing. These are often created by more sophisticated and more determined criminals who are highly motivated to succeed. More generally, however, most fraudulent e-mails and Web sites established for fraud may frequently be characterized by the following:

  • Misspellings and other typographical errors
  • Poor grammar
  • Urgent messages in the e-mail subject line
  • Random characters in the e-mail subject line or body

"Fuzzy" logos, or logos that are distorted

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Tricks of the Trade
There are a number of common e-mail scams of which you should be aware. While this list is by no means exhaustive, recent e-mail tricks include:

  • Creating a sense of panic. E-mails threatening loss of account access, loss of credit, foreclosure, etc., are trying to get you to panic enough to lose your common sense and fall for their scam. Don't panic; when in doubt, call your financial institution.
  • Referencing a recent transaction. Vaguely worded e-mails referring to a "recent transaction" that you need to go online and verify, or for which you need to provide additional account information, are also just trying to get you to fall for their scam.
  • Confirming your account information. It's possible that the criminals think they already have your account numbers, password, etc., and all they need is your confirmation. They could have guessed, they could have bought it, they could have stolen it. Don't give them the help they need to use it. Do not respond to confirmation-of-information requests received via an e-mail that you are not expecting or that could possibly be fraudulent. This includes both not responding via e-mail and not visiting a Web site to confirm the information.
  • You're a winner! "Just send money to cover the costs/fees/taxes and you can claim your prize." If you do respond to this solicitation, the thief will have your money as well as your credit or debit card information if you pay online, or your checking account number and bank routing information if you pay by check. A legitimate contest will never make you pay to receive the prize.
Your donation is needed. Many criminals act like they are actually charities and request your donations, appealing to your emotions and taking advantage of tragedies and natural disasters. Be careful when making charitable donations. Many legitimate organizations now accept donations online. But exercise caution and only donate via a non-profit organization's Web site directly, or if you are absolutely sure of the company through which you are donating.
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Web Site Spoofing
"Spoofing" is another trick used by criminals. Criminals steal a Web site's code — the technical programming that makes the Web site work — and use it to create a fake Web site that "spoofs" or appears to be the legitimate site.
The difficulty for unsuspecting consumers is that these sites look legitimate. To help protect yourself, be aware of how you're accessing the site.

  • Don't follow a link in an unsolicited e-mail if you have any doubts about the sender (see "phishing", above).
  • Type all Web site addresses carefully, or use Favorites or Bookmarks to store frequently accessed sites — especially financial-related sites. Misspelling, even by one letter, the address of the Web site you are trying to access may send you to an incorrect, possibly fraudulent, Web site.
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Lottery / Sweepstakes Letter Scams
If you receive a letter, accompanied by a check with a National Bank of Yemen brand, that claims you have won a lottery, a sweepstakes, have been chosen to be a paid "secret shopper" or a similar variation of a popular contest, be advised that these are scam letters and fraudulent checks. If you contact the sender as requested, you will be instructed to negotiate the check and forward the sender money through a wire transfer or money order. Please do not negotiate these checks, as they are not authentic National Bank of Yemen checks. If you receive one of these letters and/or checks, you should report it to your local U.S. Postal Inspection Service.
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What You Can Do
Report any problems regarding National Bank of Yemen to your customer service representative. You also may e-mail your concerns or questions.
If you should become a victim of identity theft, you can take the following actions to help you protect your personal and financial interests:
Contact your bank and credit card issuers to ensure that:

  • Access to your accounts can be protected
  • All transactions are actually yours
  • Your address information has not been changed
  • Your PINs have not been changed
  • New checks have not been ordered by the identity thief
File a police report with your local police department and provide the facts and circumstances surrounding your loss. Obtain a police report number with the date, time, police department, location and name of the police officer taking the report or involved in the subsequent investigation. Having a police report on file will often facilitate your dealings with insurance companies, banks, credit card agencies, and commercial establishments that may be parties involved in fraudulent transactions. The police report may initiate a law enforcement investigation into the loss with the goal of identifying, arresting, and prosecuting the offender and possibly recovering your lost items. The police report will also help provide immediate clarification should someone assume your identity and be arrested for criminal activity using your name and biographical data.
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